Articles Posted in Security-Based Swaps

At a Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association conference last month, the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Division of Trading and Markets acting director John Ramsay said that the regulator will likely consider reworking a 2012 proposal that would establish margin requirements on specific swap trades now that international financial supervisors have established new margin requirements. It was The International Organization of Securities Commissions and the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision that issued the document setting up a final framework for margin requirements related to non-centrally cleared derivatives.

Ramsey said that in the wake of this document, the proposed rules that the SEC might withdraw are the ones that affect margin requirements as they pertain to certain swaps. The structure set up by the Basel-IOSCO document partially puts into place specific margin requirements on financial firms and the systematically integral non-financial entities that take part in non-centrally cleared derivatives transactions.

The regulator’s earlier proposal would have established margin requirements for security-based swap dealers and major swap participants while upping the minimum net capital requirements for brokerage firms allowed to implement the alternative internal model-based method to compute net capital. Now, however, said Ramsey, the agency could propose a new rule to make sure there is comment on a “full range of initiatives,” including the ones addressed in the Basel-IOSCO document.

Now that the SEC has unveiled its plan via a “statement of general policy ” that lays out how it intends to phase in its new rules that govern security-based swap markets, it is seeking comments. Commenters have 60 days within when the statement is published in the Federal Register to make their thoughts known. While the statement gives the order in which market participants will have to comply with the new requirements, it doesn’t provide an estimate for when the rules would actually be implemented.

The 2010 Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act’s Title VII mandates that SEC set up a security-based swaps regulatory framework. In its policy statement, the Commission grouped its rules for security-based swaps into five categories:

• Definitional rules (for regulating and registering swap data repositories) and cross-border rules (that regulate non-U.S. market participants and cross-border swap transactions)

In what one investment banking official is calling a “second wave” of securities litigation stemming from the credit and subprime crisis of 2008, financial firms are now suing other financial institutions for damages. While speaking on a Practising Law Institute panel, Morgan Stanley managing director D. Scott Tucker noted that this “second wave” is the “exact opposite of the first wave,” which was primarily brought by smaller pension funds or states claiming violations of the 1933 Securities Act and the 1934 Securities Exchange Act.

Tucker said that with this new wave, most of the plaintiffs are financial institutions, including investment managers and hedge funds, that are asserting common law fraud and making other state law claims. Also, these latest lawsuits are primarily individual cases, rather than class actions. The securities at the center of this latest wave of litigation are complex structured products, such as credit default swaps, collateralized debt obligations, and mortgage-backed securities, as well as complaints involving private placements and derivatives or securities that don’t trade on liquid markets.

Our securities fraud lawyers at Shepherd Smith Edwards & Kantas LTD LLP represent institutional investors who suffered financial losses because of their dealings with investment companies. Unlike other law firms, our stockbroker fraud lawyers will never represent brokerage firms.